Lately I have seen clients shown proposals to purchase Long-Term Care insurance with premiums exceeding $10,000 a year for a couple.  This is ridiculously expensive for most couples in their fifties, and is probably because the insurance amounts are way too large to be appropriate.… Read more...

This post, in it’s entirety, is reprinted from a chapter in the book “Surviving Alzheimer’s with Friends, Facebook, and a Really Big Glass of Wine”, written by my very good friend Honey Leveen, a first rate Long-Term Care insurance agent in Houston, TX

“Where’s the Disconnect?”… Read more...

Reprinted from the Washington Post Carolyn Hax column

On Abruptly Facing An Elderly Relative’s Need For Care

I sometimes supplement my income by senior-sitting those in need of temporary help.  Recently, a family offered me a position to live 24/7 in their mother’s home as her aide, caregiver, housekeeper, cook, laundress, hairdresser, chauffeur, med-tech, and personal care provider. … Read more...

The numbers of seniors who need personal care help is increasing, says the CDC.  The data released last Tuesday by the CDC’s National Center For Health Statistics shows that 7.2% of seniors require help with activities of daily living in 2015, compared to 6.6% in 1997. … Read more...

Yesterday’s Wall Street Journal had some interesting statistics on labor growth predicted for the next decade.  The article stated that 95% of new jobs would be in the service sector.

Previous articles have noted that the fastest growing service profession is caregiving. … Read more...

“The biggest challenge of all is holding onto your patience.”

Reprinted from Money Magazine

For years, Madeleine Smithberg has been at the forefront of American comedy as co-creator of “The Daily Show” and a talent coordinator for “Late Show with David Letterman.”… Read more...

I attended a dementia hearing recently.  Eight Wisconsin legislators were listening to ideas and problems in dealing with dementia in Wisconsin.  Many of those testifying spoke of how people will not accept home care because they think they cannot afford it.… Read more...

Reblogged from CNBC

One-time real estate agent Evelyn Rehg was showing a house to a prospective buyer four years ago when an alarming phone call came from the retirement facility where her mother lived.

“They told me I either had to get my mother immediately into a mental hospital or she would be evicted,” said Rehg, 48, of Crestwood, Missouri.  

Read more...